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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 160 (some duplicates have been removed)
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
sanctions, more sanctions. we will get congress to pass a law that will make it illegal for us to have any carrots. that means that diplomacy will not work. it is dangerous across the board. the reason why it is more dangerous to say a red line will be crossed so early is, number one, it brings it much closer, ratcheting up the political pressure. it does not change anything on the ground. but once a candidate boxes himself in, and we're talking man here, so i will not say himself/herself, one candid it boxes himself in and say i will set as a red line iran obtain nuclear capability. if gov. ronnie's good friend, benjamin netanyahu, says that he believes that iran has obtained nuclear capability, candidate romney would say one thing and president romney would feel differently on making good on that. >> you mentioned the state of israel, the nation of israel. let's talk about that for just a second. mr. netanyahu has been unsuccessful over the past few weeks, no matter how much he has tried, even inside of israel, making the case that he has tried to make about the red line and backing the
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
. >> do you believe fundamental any a man or a woman's right to protest? >> yes. it depends on the laws of any nation. all nation's laws are not equal. they differ. in most countries, one way or another, this is allowed under the laws but fundamentally, i do agree, certainly people must be allowed to express their own opinions freely, freedom is part of the essential rights of all nations. >> if that is -- >> no one has the right to take that away. >> if that is the case, why has the daughter of the former president of iran, why has she been imprisoned for protesting against your regime? >> in iran, there is only one regime, so perhaps they are protest against that and in iran, the judicial branch is not under the power of the government, they have their own laws and's what they follow. and we have no interference in that. the government has paved wait four the highest form of freedom of most people. you see people criticize, people sometimes trespass the border lines of proper as a president, i'm not middle of the people of iran, without drawing any borders, without drawing any reed re
might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't know his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where
still need this law. that is really unfortunate. host: willie in jacksonville, florida. independent. caller: good morning. with the lady that just called -- my thing is there must not be enough highly educated black institutions for black folks to keep saying i have to go to harvard to get my education, to stanford or something like that. i just do not understand. being black, we do not have the professors, at least the same criteria. to me, it seems like we are no further than we were before. we're still trying to get an education at your school. 500 years, and we do not have no qualified school on the same level with these schools and professors that is on the same level? see what i'm saying? host: here is bill powers, the 28 president of the university of texas, writing in today's "wall street journal." "history repeats itself wednesday in an eerie but ironic way." host: in the opinion in 2003 that adam liptak referred to, that justice sandra day o'connor wrote that the constitution -- host: that is sandra day o'connor, writing back in 2003. from rockville center, new york, a rep
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
because labor rolls -- rules. it is the epa and the laws. >> regulation. >> it is not just uncertainty. it is fear of the worst-case scenario coming down the pike. the worst-case scenario is that you do not do with this and their unbalanced tax system. you let the regulatory regime continue to squelch entrepreneurs. you don't take seriously our long-term energy needs and demands and create an affordable and reliable supply of north american energy. >> you fly right off the fiscal cliff. >> it was a shocking experience for a lot of people to go back a few months. the first time we hit the debt ceiling, all the seven whether you were a lender or somebody here who is proud of the way this country had managed to fair, all the sudden policy makers are running right at to the edge. you cannot pay your bills. there is nobody in business that would be allowed to walk away like that. what we're saying is that people in charge of both parties said it takes leadership and the execs -- in the executive branch. it takes leadership. the decisions have to be made. i see governors in both parties have
rights, equal citizenship, under the law. we have a mission. we must call for this spirit. more than ever before there is an urgency now. some folks might be wary because the road to freedom has never been an easy one. some folks have scars on their backs. some folks have been that still aches in their soul. we cannot stop. james baldwin said that human history is a perpetual testament to the achievement of the impossible dream of america must drive us forward. we must not fail now. when other people want to drive us, we must be the hope. when people drive us to doubt, we must be the fate. i learned this from my family and my parents and my grandparents that one folks tried to tell you if you are lesser when one person stand up straight and strong, and they lived an entire nation. [applause] when one person defiantly refuses to be relegated to second class, we are all elevated. this is what everybody must understand. you cannot deny the right of freedom and liberty of others without diminishing your own. this is what we must understand. what king said from a jail cell rings true for all o
that the university of michigan law school, where they did use race in admission, had a lower level of -- they considered 14% to be a critical mass, much less than what the university of texas achieved through race-neutral means. i think this goes a long way to explaining why most observers think the supreme court is likely to strike down the use of race at the university of texas. the second question we take up, what should replace race-based affirmative action if it in fact is struck down by the u.s. supreme court? in a report, we look at nine states where, because of voter initiative or executive order or legislation, universities -- they did not give up on diversity and tried to find other ways of achieving racial and ethnic diversity. these plans were hardly perfect, but in many ways there are better than the old style of race-based affirmative action. you can see that in our analysis, six state street -- six states created partnerships with disadvantaged by schools to increase the pipeline of low- income and minority students. seven of the states provide class-based admission
to agree with you with their level of investments. >> second row on the side. >> after rule of law committee for the oceans, in the mid century, nicholas said geography was one of the most important factors in foreign affairs because it was the most permanent. this year we just saw the arctic icecap dropped another 750,000 square kilometers and appears to be opening more this session. what do you think this trend will mean not next year or even next decade but in a generation as that becomes more open for russia and canada in particular. >> nicholas pikeman is someone i devote a whole chapter to in this book because he is very provocative and here is the man who when it was unclear that china where defeat japan, predicted that china who is our ally at the time would become our adversary for geographical reasons and also said when europe was fighting for its life against germany, united europe could be a competitor for the united states. she was very clear volume. in terms of the arctic icecap, this is playing out over decades. if you had an arctic open for shipping and a close frie
banning people from voting. >> i served my time. i'm back. so why can't i vote? i live under the laws that they passed but i can't vote with regards to those laws and the people who passed them. >> cenk: and we have jon stewart versus bill o'reilly. debate of the century? >> i'm not giving up to anything. >> cenk: that's awesome. what lessons can we learn from that. that's on tonight's show. and we haven't even got to the insane republicans yet. they say you know what? the flavor was not so bad. we talk about how you should execute disobedient children, and he's not kidding. and on top of that we have not even gotten to the elbows of the day. that's something else. oh, it's a hell of a show. and it's go time. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> romney: hope has not been a strategy. >> i've been waiting for 20 years for this speech. >> he has made mistakes. >> it all seems abstract. >> obama: the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >> i acknowledge the president's success and i think he has every right to take credit. >> this president's policies have not been equal
are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among black and it is white, so there's still discrimination going on in this country, and we still need this law. it's really unfortunate. >> host: will be in jacksonville florida, independent. your thoughts are next, willie. >> caller: yes, good morning. it must not be enough highly educated black institutions say i have to go to harvard to get a certain education. we don't have -- we reached the same criteria. we are still lacking and i get an education at the school. i just don't understand. they have no qualified school that is on the same level with these schools and professors on the same level. uc-irvine saying? >> host: here is the 28 president of the university of texas at austin writing in today's wall street journal traer. he writes history repeats itself when they are in an ironic way the university of texas goes before the supreme court to defend the missions. it lasted 62 years ago when he men's white and african
, this man returned to new york to continue his law practice. he also acted in american express commercials. oh, wow. i was going to show you a little bit. actually, let's take a little bit of a look. but steve kornacki may know. >> do you know me? i ran for vice president of the united states in '64. so i shouldn't have troublie charging a meal, should i? with this, they treat me as though i had won. >> william miller. >> steve kornacki knows william miller. when we sit around in nerdland and think about this, oh, this is the one that nobody can get. of course, william miller. of course it is. >>> which unsuccessful vp candidate returned to serve as governor for 264 days before stepping down. >> sarah palin. >> very good. although there is a weird gender coherence thing going on. being, it was sarah palin. she remained governor of alaska for almost nine month before becoming the world's biggest facebooker updater. >> there was at least a while in this race a question whether or not she was going to be in the hat for the vp. but no. not this time. okay. next question. which losing vice pres
but they encouraged that everybody would vote. now understand that under the new voter i.d. laws, i was told that in some cases, they are shifting id's from people who don't have an expiration date. i retired in 1991 and i have had the same id card for 21 years. guest: sergeant major, thank you for your service. i served on active duty the same time you did. i retired in 2004 and i joined in 1984. i am revealing my age now -- there are voting assistance officers on every duty station. if you are working in the battalion headquarters or company headquarters, you might be aware of who that is. i was a logistics marine which meant i was driving a tractor trailers, served the infantry, hold all over the state of california or in open now, japan and did massive field time. i had no awareness of who the voting assistance officer was, what my deadlines were to get registered to vote. there was no awareness or training. i think everybody and acted to the can agree that there are opportunities in the military to do mandatory training. everybody knows taxes are due on april 15. we set up tax centers o
rules or the laws have changed since the last election. quoting secretary husted, we're just trying to run an election here. he says, the later you make a decision, the more likely it is to cause a problem. consistency matters in how you run an election. consistency and clarity. time is of the essence and confusion is dangerous. that's what ohio's republican secretary of state says when he's talking about voting rights and elections and democracy in his state. we're just trying to run an election he says. he says it's already late in the game. he's on the record saying those thing its when he's trying to pressure the courts into ruling his way on matters of dispute in ohio voting. when it comes to the issue of early voting, when it comes to the evident desire of ohio voters, particularly ohio democratic voters to head for the polls and bank their vote before election day comes, when it comes to this question about early voting, secretary husted decided he's going to kick this down the road. on friday a federal court ruled that ohio voters could vote early right up until election day
studies election law, it is great to be in a state where you see presidential candidates campaigning. because of our electoral college system, most of the country nowadays, it is a small number of states that get virtually all of the attention. we are either the beneficiaries are the victims, depending on your perspective. you cannot turn on the television in ohio without seeing a campaign advertisement, including many presidential advertisements, without being hit by a motorcade. in your station, channel 10, at 5:30 in the morning there is a six minute commercial break and in those minutes six different commercial ads ran. at what point is there a law of diminishing returns? guest: if your campaign has the money, you cannot go quiet. i think he would be at a disadvantage, if they go dark. more importantly, to answer the question, the vote in ohio is today, this week. these candidates are doing everything that they can, restructuring to some degree. mitt romney and the president talking directly to the camera, making their appeal. i think that dan is right. this is one of five states
here today. to my left is christopher swift. he is a fellow at the center for national security law at the university of virginia law school. he holds a bachelor's degree in government and history. a ph.d. in politics in international studies from cambridge university. he is the author of an upcoming book. most recently, he did field research in yemen, which he will be talking about today. he has served in the u.s. treasury department. thank you very much. we are pleased to have you, as well. without further ado, let me turn to peter bergen for his comments and insights. >> thank you for the introduction. i wanted to talk about the american foundation in terms of drones. [sirens] can everybody hear me? 2004 was really the first drone strike in pakistan, authorized by george w. bush. not a single drone strike has occurred outside the areas. that is one of the reasons i think he used the acquiescence in the strikes. i think there is acquiescence by the pakistan government. it would very quickly change if the drone strikes changed and other tribal regions. they are referred to as forei
is saying although they passed the budget in the house which did not become law, which cut 19%, in this rating education, he said that is not a cut, it is just a smaller increase. i want to tell that all to your parents when they no longer take at $2,500 tax credit next year if they were to win. tell that to the kids who were kicked off early education. folks come on taxes, if you go back and take a look, paul rye and saying his budget really is not a budget cut is like governor romney standing on employment lines and saying to a guy, i did not outsource your job, i off toward it. that is the distinction they make. when i point out that governor romney, a great businessman, did bain way, and outsource jobs, they said that is not what he is doing. when i pointed out that the governor and, as governor as massachusetts, sent a call service that people in massachusetts would pick up the phone and call to see whether or not they are entitled to unemployment benefits, they got somebody in asia. they outsourced that. imagine the ideas, the feeling of a guy calling, saying, how bought
on these matters. i do like virginia's laws based on freedom and disclosure. and if there was more freedom, more of the contributions would come to the campaigns. what i would like to see in any ads that are run, whether run by candidates or independent groups, including the ones that are running negative ads that are false and misleading about me, is honesty. tim has brought up this issue of pay. and he's running these ads saying that, quote, he's setting a positive example by cutting his pay as governor. and he attacks the owner. attacked me today again on it. let me give you the truthful facts and you be the judge. as governor day one i returned 10% of my salary. all four years. mark warner followed up after me a few years later and cut his by 20%. what did tim do? he didn't cut his pay at all. when he came in, he could have found followed mark warner or my example but it was well into second year as governor he cut it by just 5%. so i was the one who actually set the positive example, tim, that you followed by you did do it half heartedly. and as far as in the senate, in the senate i returne
worse. but don't dismiss the old framework lightly. credit for the 1986 reform law belongs to democrats like bill bradley in the senate. just as much as to president reagan. as a member of the house back then, i not only voted for it, but i whipped the votes to make sure it passed. i was on the committee set up by dan rostenkowski to get it done. the approach made a good deal of sense at the time. then, as now, the code was littered with egregious loopholes that needed to be reformed. recall the so-called passive law schools that were in place back then. they allowed wealthy taxpayers to gain the system. someone could invest in a bowling alley and then, if the bowling alley lost money, they could take a write off many times larger than their initial money incestment of their entire income tax liability. we need to get rid of such a gimmicky tax shelter. paring these loopholes allowed us to cut rates. at the time, that made sense, too. while it is critically important to insure that everyone, especially those at the top pay their fair share, 50% of the top federal tax rate is what we had
accessibility for insurance. we need affordability for insurance. this current law is not going to do that. it will continue to drive up health-care costs and the cost of insurance premiums. >> you have 90 seconds. >> let me tell you why -- why i have dedicated my life to the idea that everyone should have access to decent health care. there's a woman in connecticut who has worked hard all her life and so has her husband. her husband was switching jobs and in between those two jobs, during the week he was unemployed, their son was diagnosed with cancer. when it would to get insurance on her husband's new plan, they would not provide for because he had a pre-existing condition. one week or two weeks of a lifetime and they didn't have insurance. they lost everything. they lost their house, their savings, they became destitute simply because an illness happened at the wrong time. there is no repeal and replace plan. republicans in washington have voted to repeal is built 33 times that have never offered a replacement. we'd to protect this bill and perfected going forward. matters for small bu
the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
was serving when paul ryan was three. >> steve: joe biden was out of law school by the time paul ryan. >> brian: this is the biggest gap between cand dates. >> steve: i read that. >> brian: i will read that's why they are staring. reviews are pouring in over the first and only vice-presidential. ryan might have a slight margin of victory. steve with a look at the highlights. quick turn around for you. >> little bit quick and not too bad. yes, this was the first and only debate between the vice-presidential cand dates for the 2012 white house campaign. domestic side. both campaigns hitting areas that they are comfortable with. for vice-president biden this had to do with his continued to return for the need for balance between public assistance while the economy is sluggish and stem the deficit . his performance described as biden, was the happy warrior for the middle class. have a listen. >> the president and i are not going to rest until that playing field is leveled and they have a clear shot and peace of mind. until they can turn to their kid and say with a degree of confidence tha
by the rule of law, support independent judiciary and uphold fundamental freedoms. upholding the rights and the dignity of all citizens, regardless of faith, ethnicity, or gender, should be expected. and then of course we look to governments to let go of power when their time comes, just as the revolutionary libyan transitional national council did this past august. transferring authority to the newly-elected legislature in a ceremony that ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad-based growth will be a bomb and difficult process. we know that from our own history. within 235 years after our own revolution, we are still working toward that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way, times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. so this is the context in which we have to view of recent events anshaped our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. now, since this is a co
. >> hi, public international law policy group. while growing prospects to use the for u.s. influence in the region, especially given the security problems in a recent embassy attacks and challenges await governance and weak institutions. >> a great book to read on that it's not too much promised land by aaron david miller. he is a great section on how strong we think we are in the region and what we can get done and what the people on the ground think we can get done. we need to work with our allies. we need to talk to local intelligence services. that's a big problem now. we've lost contact in the intelligence services that we provide information about the bad guy. >> at huge cost -- i mean, it's not like there's any great nostalgia for the egyptians, right? >> the thing is we have a great relationship. at the end of his life, gadhafi, when condoleezza rice visited a think in 2006 or 2007, i think nixon's visit, vice president nixon's visit in 1967 or 68 was the big achievement of the bush administration put forward that they brought libya back in the cold. yes, there were human rig
storm. i am a criminal defense attorney for 19 years. i started off my law firm in 2007 and i employ 11 full-time people at my firm. i know what it is like to run a small business. we have strayed far from the principles of limited government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cage. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son ryan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is the kind of attitude i will take to the united states senate. my opponent ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 160 (some duplicates have been removed)